Porta Leoni- Verona

Yesterday, I spoke about the Porta Borsari in Verona and mentioned that there was one other gate which survived from the Roman times. This is the Porta Leoni. Unfortunately we do not know how the gate was referred to in Roman times. We call it Porta Leoni because of a sarcophagus that was found with…

Porta Borsari- the Roman gate in Verona

Verona claims to be the city in Italy that has the maximum number of ancient Roman monuments after Rome (I’m guessing that they don’t count towns like Pompeii and Herculaneum in these kind of lists). After a city makes a claim like that, I feel fairly obliged to go take a look and so I…

When you make a spectacularly awful joke…

The person on the extreme left of this panel looks like he made a spectacularly awful joke but nobody is having it.  There is not even a trace of a smile on anybody’s face. Joke maker’s reaction: “I’ll just get my coat then!” Everybody else’s reaction: “K” Hope that made you laugh! Have a good…

Moon and the Arch

The Roman Arch and the waxing moon sighted at El Djem Amphitheatre in Tunisia

Temple to Juno Caelestis

When I first came across “Temple of Caelestis” in the map to the ruins of Dougga (Tunisia), I mistook it for a temple to Ceres- the Roman Goddess of Harvest (equivalent of Demeter). It took me quite some time to realise my mistake and to understand that Caelestis was actually the shortened form of ‘Juno…

10 reasons why Trajan deserves your vote as Rome’s best Emperor

Except Augustus of course. Nobody beats Augustus. Augustus is God. If you took a street poll asking people to list names of Roman politicians/ rulers they know, you’re likely to come up with something like Julius Caesar Mark Anthony Augustus Brutus Hadrian Most recall these names either thanks to Shakespeare and a lot of people…

Water, water, everywhere- a paean to Roman aqueducts

The excerpt below is taken from the book “Rome in Africa” by Susan Raven in the chapter titled “Conquest of a Country”. “There is a legend that a Roman soldier fell in love with a native (Carthaginian) princess, who as proud as Dido, would have nothing to do with him; she would never marry him,…

Where in the empire have I been?

At the height of its power, the ancient Roman empire stretched for an area of nearly five million square kilometres all around the Mediterranean sea and in the UK. The common thread that connected all these diverse places was Roman imperial rule. The first ancient Roman monument I visited were the Roman baths at Bath,…

Baths of Caracalla- Some facts, photos and statistics

Way back in 2012, I wrote about the Baths of Caracalla following my first visit to one of the most monumental ancient Roman ruins in Italy. I learnt a lot more about the monument during a recent re-visit and I thought it would be interesting to share some of these facts with you. Baths (called…

But Marcus Agrippa didn’t fecit

The Pantheon is one of Rome’s most iconic buildings. It’s visually impressive and architecturally innovative. Considering it was built in the early 2nd Century CE, it was quite a revolutionary building. The inscription on the outside of the building says Marcus Agrippa built it during his third term as consul but this was another pantheon….

Vesuvioooooo

There’s just something about a volcano that makes it hard to take your eyes off it. Mt Vesuvius is probably one of the world’s best known volcanoes for its explosion in AD 79 which buried many towns in the vicinity including Pompeii and Herculaneum. This is a chilling video I keep coming back to. It…

On Valentine’s

I’m way too lazy to write up a new post on my phone so sharing a screenshot of my Instagram post for V day